Dont stop me from dreaming



Ask me anything   Submit
Flemming bros studios.

Flemming bros studios.

Reblogged from leilockheart

Reblogged from acehotel
acehotel:

Los Angeles, California
Dave Hickey wrote and sent this over before his book signing yesterday. 
I am interested in the survival of the art world now that the distinction between the fine arts and popular arts has dissolved — now that the one-time congeniality of the cottage industry that created most of the great art of the twentieth century has been infected by the relentless, aggressive habits of corporate and institutional culture — now that the underground which once provided a home for cultural rebels has been obliterated. For the past one hundred and fifty years, the marketplace has censored popular art. What is popular is popular art. During the same period, high art has been defined by its ability to censor its audience to a knowledgeable and sophisticated audience defined by its ability to tolerate difficulty and dissonance.
During this period, popular art was always more popular than high art. Peter Max was always more popular than Andy Warhol. Andrew Wyeth was always more popular that Alex Katz. Salvador Dali was always more popular than Georges Braque. So how does high art survive when it can be censored by its “popularity.” In this new art world, difficulty and dissonance are routinely suppressed. Writers like myself whose livelihood has been grounded in the interpretation of difficult art are rendered obsolete. Scholars devoted to assessing the historical impact and viability of difficult art are rendered obsolete. The small contingent of dealers and collectors who take chances on behalf of difficult art are rendered inconsequent. Artist devoted to pushing the envelope are de-prioritized.
So what becomes of the tradition of dissonance and difficulty? It survives, I think, but nobody thinks about it. Art is simply defined by its opacity and left opaque, so there are no historical consequences to work that might be difficult to understand. It simply dwells in the tides of fashion as the sort of thing we don’t understand and don’t care to. So, difficult art will continue to be made but no one will notice. This leaves a space for a new underground where people might pay art more careful attention to the world before their eyes.
Photo by Toby Kamps.

acehotel:

Los Angeles, California

Dave Hickey wrote and sent this over before his book signing yesterday. 

I am interested in the survival of the art world now that the distinction between the fine arts and popular arts has dissolved — now that the one-time congeniality of the cottage industry that created most of the great art of the twentieth century has been infected by the relentless, aggressive habits of corporate and institutional culture — now that the underground which once provided a home for cultural rebels has been obliterated. For the past one hundred and fifty years, the marketplace has censored popular art. What is popular is popular art. During the same period, high art has been defined by its ability to censor its audience to a knowledgeable and sophisticated audience defined by its ability to tolerate difficulty and dissonance.

During this period, popular art was always more popular than high art. Peter Max was always more popular than Andy Warhol. Andrew Wyeth was always more popular that Alex Katz. Salvador Dali was always more popular than Georges Braque. So how does high art survive when it can be censored by its “popularity.” In this new art world, difficulty and dissonance are routinely suppressed. Writers like myself whose livelihood has been grounded in the interpretation of difficult art are rendered obsolete. Scholars devoted to assessing the historical impact and viability of difficult art are rendered obsolete. The small contingent of dealers and collectors who take chances on behalf of difficult art are rendered inconsequent. Artist devoted to pushing the envelope are de-prioritized.

So what becomes of the tradition of dissonance and difficulty?
It survives, I think, but nobody thinks about it. Art is simply defined by its opacity and left opaque, so there are no historical consequences to work that might be difficult to understand. It simply dwells in the tides of fashion as the sort of thing we don’t understand and don’t care to. So, difficult art will continue to be made but no one will notice. This leaves a space for a new underground where people might pay art more careful attention to the world before their eyes.


Photo by Toby Kamps.

Reblogged from leilockheart

Reblogged from quoteinspirational

Reblogged from pursuitofhappiness00
Your fingerprints are all over who I am now. (via obscured-route)

(Source: pursuitofhappiness00, via 4lexander)

Reblogged from colibritornasol
colibritornasol:

Six months progress, My mind is even more different six months ago/now than what I see in the mirror.I just can’t believe how much my life has improved, I’m still struggling with ED and anxiety but clean eating and excercise has taken me away for self harming and throwing up (at least most of the time).There’s a long way to go, but now I know this is the life I want, I LOVE eating clean, now I love fruits and veggies, I love almond milk and spinach, I love running and sweating, I love my sore body and feeling strong, now I understand there’s no need to place a blade on my thights anymore.I’ll just keep making everything possible to be happy and live a long, happy life.

colibritornasol:

Six months progress,

My mind is even more different six months ago/now than what I see in the mirror.

I just can’t believe how much my life has improved, I’m still struggling with ED and anxiety but clean eating and excercise has taken me away for self harming and throwing up (at least most of the time).

There’s a long way to go, but now I know this is the life I want, I LOVE eating clean, now I love fruits and veggies, I love almond milk and spinach, I love running and sweating, I love my sore body and feeling strong, now I understand there’s no need to place a blade on my thights anymore.

I’ll just keep making everything possible to be happy and live a long, happy life.


Reblogged from logotv
pzcake:

forcechoked:

god bless the internet

this is so creepy

This is so damn creepy #godblesstheinternet

pzcake:

forcechoked:

god bless the internet

this is so creepy

This is so damn creepy #godblesstheinternet

Reblogged from atrophy-of-life
Do not fall in love with people like me
We will take you to
Museums and parks
And monuments
And kiss you in every beautiful place
So that you can
Never go back
Without tasting us
Like blood in your mouth.
Unknown  (via interitio)

(Source: atrophy-of-life, via 4lexander)

Reblogged from batswithsplinters
batswithsplinters:

The makings of a productive night.

batswithsplinters:

The makings of a productive night.